United States

SJR 33

Raises National Debt Ceiling

This joint resolution increases the public debt limit by $2.5 trillion

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Senator Catherine Cortez Masto

313 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington D.C. 20510

Senator Jacky Rosen

713 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington D.C. 20510

Congresswoman Dina Titus

2464 Rayburn House Office Bldg.
Washington D.C. 20515

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Senator Catherine Cortez Masto

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Senator Jacky Rosen

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Congresswoman Dina Titus

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Congresswoman Susie Lee

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Congresswoman Susie Lee

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Congressman Steven Horsford

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Congressman Steven Horsford

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Washington D.C. 20515

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[Your Name]

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[Recipient]

[Recipient Address]

[Recipient City, State Zip]

 

Dear [Recipient],

 

Unfortunately, this correspondence comes too late to address my opinions on Senate Joint Resolution 33 which was signed into law by President Biden on December 16, 2021; a bill that you voted in favor of. With that said, I would like to address something stated by White House Press Secretary, Jen Psaki, the day prior during a routine press conference. During that event the Press Secretary stated, “I’m not sure what American person is saying that or is concerned about the debt limit, but maybe there’s somebody you’ve met on the street.”

Frankly, it doesn’t surprise me that individuals who walk the street in Washington D.C. are not concerned about the debt limit; after all, most of them rely on this source of funding for their salaries. However, I can tell you who the other Americans are that are concerned about the debt limit – those who actually wake up at 4am every morning to make it to a mine site so they can put in a twelve to sixteen-hour day in order to make a living. Or the single mother who is putting in a double shift at the cafe because commodity prices and rent are skyrocketing due to inflation. Or the truck driver who hasn’t seen his family in over three months because he’s trying to chock up enough miles to afford that vacation they’ve never had. Or the rancher who has spent the last twenty-three hours out in the snow trying to save baby calves in sub-zero temperatures and now has to take the time at 9pm at night to sit down and write a letter because he just happened to hear on the news that his Congressional Representatives just fast tracked another gargantuan spending bill through their respective chambers. In other words, those Americans who actually produce something and provide a valuable service to their fellow citizens, these are the Americans concerned about the debt ceiling.

The fact is the spending has to stop! Ms. Psaki, during the same press conference stated, “The American people shouldn't be worried about whether or not elected officials are doing what they should do and raising the debt limit to make sure we're covering bills that have already been incurred.” There is some truth to this statement in that Congress is attempting to pay for bills that have already been incurred; but that raises the question, why are there so many bills? The United States has for decades under both Democrat and Republican Administrations, funded programs, research, projects, and a myriad of other aspects that fall miles outside of the limits of the U.S. Constitution. Every year the list grows larger and the cost increases and no one ever talks about curbing this pattern. Whether it’s bailing out large corporations, studying the migratory patterns of the loon, or paying for gender programs in Pakistan, it all has to stop – we simply can’t afford it.

You and your colleagues in Congress pass spending bills before considering their ramifications to the national debt. Unless of course, you consider the ramifications but ramrod the legislation through knowing full well that you have control of the debt ceiling and can adjust it on the fly. This does not work in the real world. I can’t go out and buy a $60,000 vehicle, then raise my credit limits through the lending source to accommodate for my purchase. It doesn’t work that way. The U.S. Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has continually warned since 2011 about this excessive spending stating, “A large amount of debt could also harm national security by constraining military spending in times of crisis or limiting the country’s ability to prepare for a crisis.” In 2018 the CBO projected that the United States, if continuing along the same trajectory, would see a national debt of $28.7 trillion by the year 2028 indicating that it would be 96.2% of our national GDP and the highest since WWII. Well, thanks to your efforts with SJR 33, we’ve managed to reach this horrific milestone before wrapping up 2021. It is like watching a plane stall out, then pick up speed as it descends towards earth, and we know how that will end if something is not done to correct it.

I’m pretty well convinced that most elected officials at the federal level don’t put much stock in the Bible, but regardless of what you believe regarding Almighty God and His plan for humanity, it has revealed to mankind a plethora of moral and civic axioms that have stood the test of time for several thousand years. Within the book of Proverbs, the author states, “…the borrower is slave to the lender.” Since WWII, the U.S. Congress has made slaves out of everyday Americans through the development of sustained entitlement programs and subsidies. We have done so by borrowing from the rest of the world – relying on lesser nations to support and feed our insatiable appetite. We have become slaves within and without.

In closing, I urge you and your colleagues to step across party lines and begin discussing how we as a nation are going to pull ourselves out of this nosedive. Several thought groups have already developed a framework by which we can accomplish this feat; it won’t be easy, and it won’t be fun, but our nation depends on it. And last but not least, I urge you, please, please, please, don’t support any new spending bills or raising of the debt ceiling. If we haven’t already tipped past the point of rescue, I’m convinced that we’re dangerously close.

 

 

Respectfully,

[Your Name]

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